The Price of Cool

In the article "The Price of Cool: A Teenager, a Juul and Nicotine Addiction" by Jan Hoffman, the main argument being made is that the device is extremely addictive. It also argues that the Juul can cause many other underlying effects in people who use them. The main way the author chose to present these topics is through a true story, which helps to add validity to the article. Hoffman brings about the idea of the Juul being toxic and shows this throughout her article through a true story of an individual who used one for years. In the article "The Price of Cool: A Teenager, a Juul and Nicotine Addiction" by Jan Hoffman, the main argument being made is that the device is extremely addictive. It also argues that the Juul can cause many other underlying effects in people who use them. The main way the author chose to present these topics is through a true story, which helps to add validity to the article. Hoffman brings about the idea of the Juul being toxic and shows this throughout her article through a true story of an individual who used one for years. 

The intended audience of Hoffman is college and high school age individuals.  She shows this by discussing bans on certain flavors that "appeal" to younger individuals and by giving statistics regarding high schoolers usage of the Juul. The author also gives evidence of this audience by saying the FDA’s plans of addressing teenage nicotine addiction. This article would be extremely powerful towards convincing the authors intended audience to quit. It is extremely relatable to people my age who Juul and shows how terrible it really is to be hooked on a chemical like nicotine. The use of Matt’s story in her article provided for great insight into something most of us know all too much about already. The word choice throughout the article is also very relatable for those who’re intended to read it. Instead of using the word "smoking", the author elects to use the word "hit" which is much more common among high school/college age people. Also, the writer elects to include "the head rush", older readers might not be as used to hearing.

It refers to the feeling of a dopamine spike after using nicotine. The author constantly uses word choice throughout the piece to offer comfort and to keep the target audience reading.  The three rhetorical appeals of pathos, the use of emotional appeal; logos, the use of logical argument; and ethos, the use of credibility and trust; are found throughout the entire article and used to further solidify the authors argument. The pathos found in the writing is by giving vivid detail of how Matt felt like he was feeling depressed. An image was also provided which shows him leaning up against a car looking very dejected. It was at the very top of the article and immediately set the tone for the writing. The logos found in the article is using a variety of statistics, for example “the number of middle and high school students who currently vape has soared to about 3.6 million”. Using large figures like these show that there is a crisis in the United States when it comes to vaping and addiction to it. The ethos presented in the article can be found when the authors presents information from various doctors. A quote from Dr. Rachel Boykan that was meant to hit home with the target audience is “Nicotine may disrupt the formation of circuits in the brain that control attention and learning”. This quote is powerful and comes from a very reliable source. According the article “The Price of Cool: A Teenager, a Juul and Nicotine Addiction” by Jan Hoffman, nicotine is an extremely addictive chemical that can lead to an undesirable lifestyle. She presents this idea in a multitude of ways. By having an intended audience, storytelling through a person who has first hand experience, word style, and the three rhetorical appeals. Hoffman brings about this idea of the Juul being addictive and shows this throughout her article by using a true story of an individual who suffered for years.